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06-Feb-2017 00:10

This organization makes it possible to have a gored person stabilized and taken to a hospital in less than 10 minutes.

Though there is no formal dress code, the very common and traditional attire is white pants, white shirt with a red scarf around the waist and a red handkerchief around the neck.

The benediction is a prayer given at a statue of Saint Fermin, patron of the festival and the city, to ask the saint's protection and can be translated into English as "We ask Saint Fermin, as our Patron, to guide us through the encierro and give us his blessing". Most runners dress in the traditional clothing of the festival which consists of a white shirt and trousers with a red waistband ("faja") and neckerchief ("pañuelo"). A second rocket signals that all six bulls have been released.

Also some of them hold the day's newspaper rolled to draw the bulls' attention from them if necessary. The third and fourth rockets are signals that all of the herd has entered the bullring and its corral respectively, marking the end of the event.

Another common dress practice, seen as a risk by some but as a daring depiction of courage by others is dressing in a conspicuous manner.

Many runners that want to be perceived as daring wear colors other than white, a common alternate color choice is blue.

Some parts of the fence remain in place for the duration of the fiesta, while others are placed and removed each morning.

The encierro begins with runners singing a benediction.

It is sung three times, each time being sung both in Spanish and Basque. " ("Long live Saint Fermin", in Spanish and Basque).

The Running of the Bulls (in Spanish: encierro, from the verb encerrar, "to corral, to enclose") is a practice that involves running in front of a small group of cattle, typically six, of the toro bravo breed that have been let loose on a course of a sectioned-off subset of a town's streets. The origin of this event comes from the need to transport the bulls from the fields outside the city, where they were bred, to the bullring, where they would be killed in the evening.

During this 'run', youngsters would jump among them to show off their bravado.The fastest part of the route is up Santo Domingo and across the Town Hall Square, but the bulls often became separated at the entrance to Estafeta Street as they slowed down.